Waiting time for online deliveries to arrive in South Africa

Online tracking tool, Narratiive, has released its South African eCommerce report for 2018. The data is based on a survey of 7,909 South Africans between July and August 2018, with respondents asked questions focusing on their online purchasing frequency, their most commonly purchased products, and what stops them from shopping online.

The data showed that online shopping continues on an upward trend in the country, with 44% of offline shopper survey respondents saying that they anticipate making an online purchase in the next 12 months. In addition, 73% of online shoppers say that they’ve either maintained or increased their online shopping habit in the last 12 months.

What people are buying

The report found that books (10%), travel tickets (10%) and tickets for shows and sporting events (9%) were some of the most frequently bought items in the last 12 months.

Other popular purchases include:

  • Clothes and accessories – 7%
    Hotel reservations – 7%
    DVDs, videos, and music (including CD, K7, MP3’s) – 6%
    Health and beauty products – 5%
    Software – 5%

When asked how much they spent on their last purchase, 22% said that they spent between R200 – R499, while 19% said that they spent between R500 – R999 and R1000 – R2999 respectively.

Deliveries

When asked how long it took for their last purchase to be delivered:

  • 27% said between 3-5 working days
    27% said that their delivery was instant
    21% said between 1-2 working days
    15% waited for longer than 10 days
    10% said between 5-10 working days

While some consumers indicated that they were unsatisfied with these delivery times, the majority said that they were ‘very satisfied’ (61%) or ‘fairly satisfied’ (24%).

Part of this satisfaction is likely to stem from the fact that 58% of these customers were charged no fee for this delivery, while just 14% were charged a fee of R50 or more

Source: https://businesstech.co.za

How eCommerce Startups Can Grow Exponentially

There is a general conception in South Africa that TV campaigns can only be used by big brands wanting to embark on expensive brand building campaigns.

Businesses in South Africa have a natural tendency to look to online media for their marketing as it is measurable. But online marketing can soon hit a plateau in terms of reach and generating returns. When this happens, it often makes sense to branch into offline media that can deliver a broader audience and higher reach. A general concern for businesses is how to measure ROI on the higher budgets needed for television. With the technological advances of attribution software, this is now possible in South Africa – allowing digital businesses to optimise TV campaigns on key KPIs, just like with online marketing.

The groundwork for a successful performance TV campaign begins long before booking your media. Here are some important factors to consider:

Defining your TV strategy and your goals. You need to identify your relevant target group. Understand the key drivers that will motivate them to take action (buying that product through your e-commerce shop). This will allow you to shape the messaging for your TV commercial creative.

Aligning your marketing channels. TV is only one piece of your overall marketing strategy. Online marketing plays a big role in capturing the new demand you are creating through your TV campaign. Not all new users will be coming to your website directly through your URL – some will be searching for keywords around your product. Make sure that your AdWords campaign are up and running and reflecting keywords used in your ad.

Performance thinking is an approach that DCMN applies to all our campaigns (test, learn, scale). The results of the Travelstart campaign prove that digital businesses can be just as ROI-driven with their offline marketing as they are with their online channels.

Businesses wanting to discover more about how performance TV works and how to get even more out of their TV budgets, can download a white paper containing knowledge from years of running TV campaigns for some of the fastest-growing digital brands in the world.

Source: By Irina Herf, General Manager of DCMN South Africa

South Africa to spend R63 billion online: PayPal

South Africa is expected to spend about R63 billion online, according to Efi Dahan, General Manager for Russia, Turkey, Middle East & Africa at international online payment company, PayPal.

Dahan visited SA recently to deliver a keynote speech at this year’s Seamless Africa conference, held in Cape Town last week.

He told ITWeb Africa during an exclusive interview that the country is seeing massive growth in online purchases because many consumers are using mobile devices as wallets.

According to Dahan, South Africa leads the whole of Africa in online purchases, this is despite Nigeria being home to the most e-commerce ventures in Africa – 40%, according to the Afri-Shopping: Exploring the African E-commerce Start-up Ecosystem Report 2017 by Disrupt Africa.

Dahan said online payments in SA amounted to R37 billion only two years ago, “this is amazing growth and it will continue to grow.”

PayPal stated that more consumers in Sub-Saharan Africa are looking beyond their borders to source the products and services they need.

“In fact, according to a recent KPMG The Truth About Online Consumers 2018 Report, the African/Middle Eastern markets import 50% of all online purchases from other regions, making them the number one online importer worldwide,” PayPal states.

Dahan believes the continent’s e-commerce is growing much faster than a lot of mature markets.

“South Africa is one of the main markets, I think this is because of the mobile penetration happens much faster. Mobile is extremely important because people are starting to use their mobile phone not just to make calls or get WhatsApp messages or SMS; they use the mobile as a wallet,” said Dahan.

“This is the future because mobile is also more secure and payment platforms know more about the user’s behaviour.”

Dahan said the company operates in 50 countries across the continent, with SA, Kenya and Nigeria being the biggest.

Source: By Masibulele Lunika